DELIVERING BUNDLE OF JOY

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Delivering bundle of joy

MODE OF DELIVERY

Mode of delivery is usually discussed out with the patient at 36 weeks. Rate of cesarean section is usually greater in ART pregnancies compared to natural conception. This is not purely because the pregnancy after treatment is a precious pregnancy. It is so as ART pregnancies have higher rate of complications like Multiple pregnancies, Placenta previa, Pregnancy induced hypertension and Intrauterine growth retardation.

However normal vaginal delivery should be offered to all women who have uneventful antenatal course with no indication for cesarean section.


Painless Delivery

Painless delivery refers to the use of an epidural injection for pain relief during labor. An anesthesiologist gives an injection in the lower back and places a plastic tube through which drugs are released around your spinal cord.

Normal delivery

vaginal delivery is the giving birth to offspring[1] (babies in humans) alive in mammals through the vagina, also called birth canal. It is the natural method of birth for all mammals except monotremes, which lay eggs into the external environment. The average length of a hospital stay for a normal vaginal delivery is 36–48 hours or with an episiotomy (a surgical cut to widen the vaginal canal) 48–60 hours, whereas a C-section is 72–108 hours

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    Types of vaginal delivery

    Different types of vaginal deliveries have different terms:

    • A spontaneous vaginal delivery (SVD) occurs when a pregnant female goes into labor without the use of drugs or techniques to induce labor, and delivers her baby in the normal manner, without forceps, vacuum extraction, or a cesarean section.
    • An assisted vaginal delivery (AVD) or instrumental vaginal delivery occurs when a pregnant female goes into labor (with or without the use of drugs or techniques to induce labor), and requires the use of special instruments such as forceps or a vacuum extractor to deliver her baby vaginally.
    • An induced vaginal delivery is a delivery involving labor induction, where drugsor manual techniques are used to initiate the process of labor. Use of the term "IVD" in this context is less common than for instrumental vaginal delivery.
    • A normal vaginal delivery (NVD) is a vaginal delivery, whether or not assisted or induced, usually used in statistics or studies to contrast with a delivery by cesarean section.

Ceaserian section

Caesarean section, also known as C-section, or caesarean delivery, is the use of surgery to deliver babies. A caesarean section is often necessary when a vaginal delivery would put the baby or mother at risk. This may include obstructed labor, twin pregnancy, high blood pressure in the mother, breech birth, or problems with the placenta or umbilical cord. A caesarean delivery may be performed based upon the shape of the mother's pelvis or history of a previous C-section. A trial of vaginal birth after C-section may be possible. The World Health Organization recommends that caesarean section be performed only when medically necessary. Some C-sections are performed without a medical reason, upon request by someone, usually the mother

A C-section typically takes 45 minutes to an hour. It may be done with a spinal block, where the woman is awake, or under general anesthesia. A urinary catheter is used to drain the bladder, and the skin of the abdomen is then cleaned with an antiseptic. An incision of about 15 cm (6 inches) is then typically made through the mother's lower abdomen. The uterus is then opened with a second incision and the baby delivered. The incisions are then stitched closed. A woman can typically begin breastfeeding as soon as she is out of the operating room and awake. Often, several days are required in the hospital to recover sufficiently to return home

C-sections result in a small overall increase in poor outcomes in low-risk pregnancies. They also typically take longer to heal from, about six weeks, than vaginal birth. The increased risks include breathing problems in the baby and amniotic fluid embolism and postpartum bleeding in the mother.[3]Established guidelines recommend that caesarean sections not be used before 39 weeks of pregnancywithout a medical reason. The method of delivery does not appear to have an effect on subsequent sexual function.

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